The Malta Independent 16 December 2017, Saturday

New petrol stations: immediate moratorium needed

Carmel Cacopardo Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 09:52 Last update: about 9 days ago

For a short period of time, the number of new petrol stations in Malta was on the decline but recently this trend has reversed, undoubtedly as a result of the Planning Authority New petrol stations are mushrooming all over the place, and not only is it easier to obtain a development permit to construct a petrol station but you get the added ‘concession’ to ruin up to 3,000 square metres of surrounding land.

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Those proposing the development of new petrol stations claim to be doing us a favour. They argue that the increasing number of cars on the road necessitates more and more petrol stations. The number of petrol stations in the Maltese Islands currently stands at around 80 and new ones are mushrooming, undoubtedly fuelled by the 3,000 square metres permissible footprint in the 2015 planning policy.

It is submitted that the policy on the development of fuel stations should complement the policy on the phasing out of internal combustion engines and an immediate moratorium on the development of new petrol stations is essential.

During the 2017 General Election campaign, Alternattiva Demokratika proposed the phasing out of vehicles running on internal combustion engines in Malta over a 20-year period. This time-frame was deemed sufficient to develop an infrastructure for electric-driven cars. It was also deemed to be a reasonable time-frame to permit those who possessed vehicles running on internal combustion engines driven vehicles to adjust to a new reality without petrol or diesel.

This position was also taken up by the Labour government in Malta after the June election. However, the details have not yet been determined.

Various other countries have decided on, or are considering, eliminating internal combustion engine-driven vehicles from their road, including Norway (by 2025), the Netherlands (by 2025), Germany (by 2030), France (by 2040), the United Kingdom (by 2040), India (by 2040) and China (by 2040). Others will soon inevitably follow.

In addition, car manufacturers are considering shifting to a manufacturing mode that will only produce hybrid or fully electric cars. Volvo will be proceeding down such a path by 2019 and no doubt others will follow fast on Volvo’s heels.

In this context, does it make any sense to continue issuing development permits for more petrol stations?

We need an in-depth examination of transport-related policies. It is clear to everyone that our roads are bursting at the seams and that the further development of our road infrastructure is opening up our roads to more cars as a consequence adding to our pollution problems and simultaneously making our accessibility worse.

An overhaul of Malta’s transport policies should seek to promote sustainability, thereby reducing the number of cars on our roads.

Yesterday, I addressed a press conference on the site of the proposed extension to the road network at Attard. This project, when implemented, will take up valuable irrigated agricultural land. This is one more instance which will increase the number of cars on our roads, gobble up agricultural land and ruin the life of full time farmers.

Transport policy on these islands seems to be multi-directional, sending mixed signals in all directions and some coherence is required. Establishing a moratorium on the construction of new petrol stations and establishing a date by which internal combustion engine-driven vehicles will be phased out from our roads would be a good first step. This should then be followed by ending the crazy spree of the development of new roads.

It is a process that will lead us to reclaim our roads for our own use, but then it will take some time.

 

An architect and civil engineer, the author is Chairman of Alternattiva Demokratika -The Green Party in Malta.

 carmel.cacopardo@alternattiva.org.mt ,    http://carmelcacopardo.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

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