The Malta Independent 17 October 2018, Wednesday

NGO presents sea-cleaning technology to raise awareness on pollution

Jeremy Micallef Friday, 10 August 2018, 12:10 Last update: about 3 months ago

The sea-cleaning technology Seabin was presented today by activist group #Zibel, with the hope of raising awareness about the levels of pollution present in our waters, and showing that the means to help prevent more exists.

The Seabin technology gained mass interest from a viral video which surfaced online some years ago. The machine is a floating debris interception device designed to be installed in the water of marinas, Yacht Clubs, ports, and any water body with a calm environment and services available.

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It is manufactured from recycled material, and can catch an estimated 1.5kgs of floating debris per day including micro-plastics up to 2mm small. Over the course of a year, this would come up to half a ton of debris.

The goal is to increase community interaction to encourage industry to follow suit, and cast a huge Seabin net over the whole island to have as clean seas as possible.

Present at the Marina di Valletta was Environment Minister Jose Herrera, who noted that whenever he visited marinas abroad, priority would be given to cleaning up the mess that the boats leave. Further commenting that “it is about time we introduce this culture here in Malta”.

Speaking on the current projects being undertaken by his ministry, Herrera said that he thinks it would be a good idea if the Seabin technology is taken up, and investments be made to better the situation.

“It is not enough for us to take initiatives to clean up, but people should be more cautious when they come to dispise of their waste. We have a tendency here, unfortunately, a culture here, of looking our own property very well; our houses, our gardens. But when it comes to the outdoors we are a bit reckless and careless.”

Herrera praised movements like #Zibel for educating people, and making it “fashionable to be smart and clean” for the younger generations.

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