The Malta Independent 20 November 2018, Tuesday

The Guardian of Future Generations

Carmel Cacopardo Sunday, 14 October 2018, 10:00 Last update: about 2 months ago

The politics of sustainable development advocates a long-term view. The familiar Brundtland definition put forward in 'Our Common Future' - the concluding report of the World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987 - is clear enough: meeting the needs of the present without compromising the needs of future generations to meet their own needs. (Gro Harlem Brundtland is a former Norwegian Social Democrat Prime Minister.)

This definition has been quoted quite often, but when it comes to its implementation, matters generally develop on a different path. Short-term needs take over, making a mockery of all the declarations in favour of sustainable development. Way back in 1987, Bruntland sought to draw our attention to this. In fact, her report emphasises  the fact that: "We act as we do because we can get away with it: future generations do not vote; they have no political or financial power; they cannot challenge our decisions."

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This was the reason why, on behalf of Alternattiva Demokratika, way back in 2012 I proposed the setting up of a Guardian of Future Generations - a proposal that had originally been presented by Malta at the preparatory meetings for the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 and which was taken on board by Mario de Marco, then Environment Minister.

The position was set up as part of the provisions of the Sustainable Development Act of 2012 but unfortunately, since day one, not enough resources have been made available in order that the Guardian of Future Generations may act today on behalf of a better tomorrow.

Chev. Maurice Mizzi, who currently heads the Guardian of Future Generations, recently issued a statement which gave the thumbs down to the dB-ITS project at Pembroke. Chev. Mizzi emphasised that it was the lack of a masterplan for the area that justified applying the brakes to the project at this point in time. He further stated that there was a need for all authorities to place more value on the views of the common citizens, so that they are empowered to ensure that their rights, as well as their quality of life, are properly protected.

Without in any way diminishing the positive step taken by the Guardian of Future Generations in respect of the dB-ITS project, I would respectfully point out that we have not heard much more from that end. The list of responsibilities of the Guardian is long and, if acted upon, would make the Guardian much more than a post of symbolic value, as described by the local press recently.

The list of responsibilities of the Guardian are grouped in the legislation under 10 headings, ranging from the promotion of sustainable development advocacy across national policy-making, legislation and practices, to encouraging sustainable development within the private sector and up to the need to direct the focus of the Office of the Prime Minister to safeguard future generations.

After six years of existence it is about time that the Guardian of Future Generations stands up on its feet and speaks up loud and clear on all matters that will have an impact on future generations. Unfortunately, so far it has rarely spoken up, apart from regarding the db-ITS project statement. This is certainly not enough. I have no doubt that the Guardian would like to do more, but it cannot because it has been deprived of resources - which has been the situation since it was created.

The Guardian of Future Generations has a lot of potential which is as yet undeveloped. The time for taking action is ripe.

 

 


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