The Malta Independent 28 June 2022, Tuesday

Malta placed disappointing 16th out of 18 countries in Eurovision semi-final

Sunday, 15 May 2022, 09:50 Last update: about 2 months ago

Malta only finished 16th out of 18 countries in its Eurovision semi-final last Thursday, the results published after Saturday night’s Grand Final show.

Emma Muscat represented Malta with the song ‘I Am What I Am’, and while there were high hopes for the singer – who is one of the country’s most well-known artists on an international stage – the final result can only be described as a disappointing one.

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Muscat finished with 47 points to her name – equal with Ireland’s Brooke, and ahead of only Montenegro and Georgia who finished 17th and 18th respectively.

She received 20 points from the televoting (16th place) and another 27 points from the jury voting (12th place).

In the televoting, Malta acquired three points each from Ireland, Estonia, North Macedonia, and Azerbaijan; two points each from Belgium, Serbia, and Sweden; and a point each from Montenegro and Cyprus.

In the jury meanwhile, Malta acquired seven points from Sweden; six points each from Ireland and North Macedonia; two points each from Azerbaijan and Israel; and a point each from Estonia, San Marino, Czech Republic, and Georgia.

It is the first time Malta failed to qualify for the Eurovision final since 2018, when Christabelle took part, and Malta’s worst performance in a semi-final since Claudia Faniello finished 16th in her semi-final in 2017 and failed to quality.

Ukraine’s Kalush Orchestra ran out as the winners of Saturday’s Grand Final, after massive support in the televoting from across Europe propelled them past runners-up the United Kingdom, who received the most votes from European juries.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy welcomed the victory and said that the country will do its best to host next year’s contest in the city of Mariupol, which has been one of the epicentres of fighting in the ongoing Russian invasion.

 

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